Childhaven Wins Prestigious International Mind, Brain, and Education Society Award

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Nell Robinson, Childhaven’s parenting skills program manager, accepting the award at the 2016 IMBES Conference in Toronto.

Childhaven has been named the recipient of the Exemplifying the Mission Award from the International Mind, Brain, and Education Society (IMBES). Nell Robinson, Childhaven’s parenting skills program manager, accepted the award on the organization’s behalf at the 2016 IMBES Conference in Toronto.

The award recognizes pre-K-12 educators, institutions, or programs demonstrating success in establishing, building, and supporting infrastructure that enhances collaboration between themselves and mind, brain, education researchers for the purpose of improving educational knowledge and practice.

IMBES selected Childhaven because of the strategic partnerships we have built in an effort to validate and replicate our model so that it can be shared with preschools, childcare providers, and home visitation groups.

Childhaven was nominated by Liliana Lengua, professor of psychology and director of the Center for Child and Family Well-Being at the University of Washington, and Silvia Bunge, professor of psychology and director of the Building Blocks of Cognition Laboratory at the University of California at Berkeley.

In their nomination, the professors noted, “Childhaven is a regional leader on childhood trauma, and their work has the potential to impact treatment and research nationwide. Through innovative prevention and intervention programs, Childhaven is well-positioned to increase its long-term impact for vulnerable children and families to communities in which the need for effective trauma treatment continues to escalate.”

Both nominating professors work with Childhaven on the “Learning Through Play” intervention being developed in partnership with Harvard University’s Frontiers of Innovation program. The ground-breaking project focuses on building the foundations of reasoning and self-regulation skills, and involves a strategy for coaching the parent and child together in game-playing.

“It’s gratifying and highly motivating to win this award,” said Childhaven’s Nell Robinson. “Being able to share our work brought up many more possibilities around refinement of the work and better impact. This will help the families we serve and has the potential to help thousands more beyond our doors.”

To learn more about the intervention, visit the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University’s “Learning Through Play” webpage, or read “The Stamp of Poverty” by John D. E. Gabrieli and Silvia A. Bunge, published in Scientific American Mind.

More information on the International Mind, Brain, and Education Society (IMBES) is available on its website at www.imbes.org.